Archive | August, 2012

Frantic at the Fringe 2012 – Part III

31 Aug

My time in Edinburgh was flying by but I was lucky enough to get tickets for Speed of Light where runners in light suits weave subtle illuminated patterns across the ‘mountain’ at night offering a new visual interpretation of Arthur’s Seat.  Contrary to what many people think, Arthur’s Seat is not a dormant volcano but a small section of a bigger post-volcanic landscape.  It is a dominant feature in Edinburgh and a special part of the city.  I’ve climbed it before but never at night!

NVA’s Speed of Light at Arthur’s Seat. Image via www.telegraph.co.uk

I’d been reading on Twitter about people preparing to do this night walk all month and to say I was excited would be an understatement.  Speed of Light seeks to fuse public art and sporting endeavour.  On arrival, you’re shown into large tents at the bottom of the walking path.  Surrounded by people in waterproofs with rucksacks and serious walking boots, we began to realise that handbags and fleeces may not cut it with this crowd.  However, we felt better when our clothing was approved and we were told that people had actually been dense enough to arrive in flipflops!  Groups set off at staggered times throughout the evening and, after a safety briefing and introduction, we were handed our walking sticks.  The audience becomes part of the work and these illuminated sticks become striking elements set against the dark brooding landscape of Arthur’s Seat.

Our walking sticks when we reached the summit. Own photograph.

Sadly, despite our eagerness, Speed of Light was underwhelming.  The publicity shots have all been taken with slow exposures and the spectacle isn’t quite what was promised (my shoddy photos give a more realistic idea).  The idea is brilliant and sometimes you get a feel for how it should be but with the fabulous backdrop of Edinburgh at night, the work so often gets lost.  There is no doubt that it was memorable and that we enjoyed ourselves but it could have been so much more.

NVA’s Speed of Light at Arthur’s Seat seen against the cityscape. Image via www.telegraph.co.uk

However, nothing else at the Festival compares to it.  Even the chattering drunk people in our group fell silent as we neared the summit and they felt the power of the pilgrimage-like walk we had undertaken.  Our singing light sabres didn’t half make a racket near the top as apparently they respond to altitude.  We were nearly blown away (literally not metaphorically) while we had to stop on the viewing platform and ended up hugging like penguins to stay upright.  At this point, while moaning and giggling, we were told off for talking and not appreciating the whining of our sticks.

Trying to photograph the piece with a normal camera. Own photograph.

At the summit, you leave a section of your staff in a vibrating urn-like thing, that wasn’t working properly on the night of our ascent, and then you slip and slide your way back down.  At times our group began to split up and, at one point, I seemed to be leading several other people without an official guide in sight.  Not the best idea considering that I can often be quite accident-prone and that I couldn’t really see where I was going.

I do have criticisms and I was rather disappointed by the end but this is an incredible project and I’m so pleased that we had the opportunity to be involved.  Reading about it afterwards has made the piece seem far more fulfilling – the work has been three years in the making and has involved not only the development of new technologies but the training of over 4,000 runners (it’s a shame that more of them weren’t involved at any one time).  There is some great merchandise on sale at the base including a beautiful book on Arthur’s Seat itself and when you finish the walk you are handed a programme about the project that explains the concept in illuminating detail (sorry!).

NVA’s Speed of Light at Arthur’s Seat. Image via www.telegraph.co.uk

We were both fitter than we realised and were remarkably unscathed when we finished and headed off for crepes and drinks to celebrate and boast (no-one thought we’d actually do it).

Somehow I made the time to visit the National Gallery of Modern Art as well.  Modern 1 is showing Picasso and Modern British Art which I have recently seen at Tate Britain.  Modern 2, however, is showing Edvard Munch: Graphic Works from the Gunderson Collection with around 50 lithographs and woodcuts owned by a private Norwegian collector.  The exhibition concentrates on how Munch revisited and re-explored his subjects.  Having recently visited the Munch exhibition at Tate in London, this exhibition highlighted to me how much stronger Munch’s graphic works are than his painted works.  Included is a 1895 lithograph on paper of The Scream, one of only two known prints of this work that Munch hand-coloured.

Edvard Munch, The Scream, 1895. Image via www.i-onmagazine.co.uk

The exhibition also includes a display of archival materials relating to Munch’s first solo show in Edinburgh, in the winter of 1931-2, organised by the Society of Scottish Artists.  Due to the repetitive nature of Munch’s work this exhibition doesn’t take too long to get around but it’s well mounted and does what it says on the tin.  As ever, there is some fantastic sculpture dotted around the grounds of the Modern Galleries including a Gormley and a Roger Hiorns.

Gormley at the Gallery of Modern Art. Own photograph.

In contrast, the current exhibition at the National Gallery requires a bit more thought before you even walk through the door.  This is not an exhibition of Van Gogh and Kandinsky works as most visitors seem to expect (we overheard several people asking the guards where the rest of the Van Goghs were).  The full title is Van Gogh to Kandinsky: Symbolist Landscape in Europe, 1880-1910.  Please take careful note so you don’t get a surprise as there are only two Van Goghs and two Kandinskys in the entire show.   Instead, the exhibition, ordered by artistic trends, showcases landscapes from this period that express the anxieties and aspirations of the symbolists through their interpretation of the natural world.  The exhibition is fundamentally a survey of landscape painting, looking at an area of symbolism that has received little attention until now.  Although there are some famous names dotted throughout, the exhibition also includes artists that even the most ardent art historian wouldn’t pretend to know.

Hung with slightly overpowering wall colours, the exhibition feels like a mixed bag.  Plus, I was still somewhat disappointed by the slightly misleading title.  There are some great individual works hidden here but it’s a collection of landscape paintings and I felt a bit let down.  I thought they’d have gone more for the wow factor during the festival.

Piet Mondrian, (Woods) near Oele, 1908.  Image via http://edinburghfestival.list.co.uk

As well as all this, I managed to see 57 theatre shows during my two and a bit weeks up at the Fringe and would have happily crammed in some more if I could have used a magic wand to add some extra hours into the day.  I won’t go on about that here but will gladly wax lyrical about what I saw if you bump into me when I’m out and about.  I certainly didn’t manage all the art exhibitions in the city (I was upset not to get to Summerhall, except at night for the bar which was lovely) but I have crossed out lots of spaces on my art map and next year I’ll try to beat my own gallery count and see how many I can manage.  Bring on Edinburgh 2013!

Speed of Light takes places on selected nights at Arthur’s Seat until 1st September 2012, http://speedoflight2012.org.ukEdvard Munch: Graphic Works from The Gundersen Collection is at the National Gallery of Modern Art until 23rd September 2012 and Van Gogh to Kandinsky: Symbolist Landscape in Europe 1880-1910 is at the National Gallery of Scotland until 14th October 2012, www.nationalgalleries.org.

Frantic at the Fringe 2012 – Part II

28 Aug

So, only a week or so after my first trip I found myself back at King’s Cross early one Saturday morning boarding a train to Edinburgh.  Having previously realised that my aim to see everything in the Edinburgh Art Festival was a tad ambitious, I’d scaled back and had a more manageable list in hand.

My first visit was to the Talbot Rice Gallery – an absolutely stunning space .  The gallery has two main areas: first is the White Gallery which shows a changing programme of contemporary exhibitions.   For the EAF, the gallery is showing Tim Rollins and K.O.S.: The Black Spot which explores Rollins’ group strategy that enabled him to study literature and produce works of art as a response to the learning process.  Through this Rollins and his peers created their own unique aesthetic solution that inspired some intriguing works responding to literary masterpieces. The exhibition title comes from Treasure Island and the painting created in response summons audiences to reinvigorate a belief that the power of art can change lives.

Tim Rollins and K.O.S.: The Black Spot at Talbot Rice Gallery. Image courtesy of Chris Park and the Talbot Rice Gallery.

There is also the Georgian Gallery with an impressive neoclassical interior, originally designed by William Playfair as a natural history museum.  The upper level displays works from the Torrie Collection, collected by Sir James Erskine of Torrie in the early 19th Century. They are predominantly made up of 17th Century Dutch paintings across a range of different genres.  Erskine, a former student, bequeathed the works to Edinburgh University on his death.   Downstairs houses changing exhibitions and it is here that their second exhibition of Donald Judd drawings is located.  Talbot Rice Gallery are the first in Scotland to examine Judd’s working methods.  The exhibition brings together a number of Judd’s drawings and materials, mostly never before seen in public, all closely connected to his three-dimensional works.  Even after he abandoned painting, drawing was always an important component of Judd’s practice allowing him to problem-solve and express his thoughts and ideas.  The drawings don’t adhere to any formal method of composition-making and his lines escape from the pages, disappearing from our sight.

Donald Judd’s drawings in the Georgian Gallery.  Image courtesy of Chris Park and the Talbot Rice Gallery.

One morning, I realised that my flat on Abercrombie Place was very near a whole series of small commercial galleries and so after breakfast I set off, umbrella in hand, for a little stroll.  My first stop was the Open Eye Gallery who were showing John Bellany at 70 to precede a major retrospective of his work at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery which will celebrate his birthday.  Much of Bellany’s work focuses on the fishing communities and harbours that he saw when growing up in Port Seton.  Recently, Bellany moved to Tuscany and the bright optimistic colour range is a relatively new development inspired by his new surroundings.

John Bellany at 70. Own photograph.

Just along the road, Dundas Street is full of galleries.  Bourne Fine Art are showing an exhibition of works by Jock McFayden to coincide with his exhibition at the Fleming Collection in London.  McFayden defines himself very much as an artist rather than a painter and he sees his works as an organic way of describing the world we live in.  The gallery is very atmospheric but, fundamentally, it is just another commercial gallery where the exhibition spills into the office space, meaning you have to tiptoe past working desks to see all the paintings.  Underneath Bourne is the Dundas Street Gallery, a hire space that was closed and looking rather forlorn.

The closed Dundas Street Gallery. Own photograph.

Carrying on down the hill, I popped into The Scottish Gallery for their Duncan Shanks exhibition where large abstract paintings are filled with emerging heaving forms.  On my way back into town I stopped at the National Portrait Gallery.  This is a huge, beautiful gallery and one where you could easily spend hours or just pop in for 15 minutes to have a nose through one room and soak up the atmosphere.  When it opened in 1869, the space was the first purpose-built portrait gallery in the world and, since then it has expanded and grown from strength to strength. With works spread across 17 large galleries, here is somewhere to lose yourself, particularly during the Fringe when you’re longing for a bolthole away from the madness.

The National Portrait Gallery. Own photograph.

Although I had the amazing EAF art map to help me know where all the smaller galleries are, the blue festival signs outside all the venues are more helpful than you can imagine and act as art beacons around the city.  The Ingleby Gallery are showing Ian Hamilton Finlay’s Twilight Remembers which was included in lots of the festival previews and looked set to be a hit.  I wasn’t let down.  Before even mentioning the art, I have to say what genuinely nice people are working at this gallery.  You’re greeted on arrival and handed the information sheets.  They seem so pleased to see you and delighted that you’ve chosen to visit.  I can think of a fair few other spaces that could learn from this.

Ian Hamilton Finlay’s Twilight Remembers at Ingleby Gallery. Own photograph.

Downstairs is quite subdued with a video piece, Carrier Strike, models, postcards and rare works on paper. For me, this exhibition really comes alive on the first floor.  Three large boulders, bearing the names of Japanese war planes, become stepping stones from the Pacific warzone to Finlay’s famous garden, Little Sparta.  In the Pentland Hills, near Edinburgh, Little Sparta brings together Finlay’s work in a natural landscape which is shaped and changed around the artistic and aesthetic needs of the works.  The garden itself becomes an artwork, encompassing all the individual pieces under its ‘umbrella’.   Upstairs explores the garden offering puns and teasing evocations about what the five-acre outdoor space may offer.  Ingleby ran a number of trips throughout August but I only realised too late and then couldn’t free up the time – I’m gutted that I didn’t get to visit as it’s not regularly open to the public.

Finlay often explores the French Revolution in his work and two sculptures in the exhibition allude to specific historical moments – the Reign of Terror in 1794 and the Ventose, the sixth month in the new calendar adopted in 1792.  The spade refers specifically to the 10th day of that month and conjures up a layering of multiple evocative ideas.  Finlay’s use of objects such as spades and gravestones are a wonder.  Gelling seamlessly into the natural world, they are beautiful pieces of art that offer moments of reflection on all around us.

Ian Hamilton Finlay’s Twilight Remembers at Ingleby Gallery. Own photograph.

Later in the week, I found time to go to the Edinburgh College of Art where, alongside the postgraduate degree show, there is a video work, Apes as Family by Rachel Mayeri and also an exhibition responding to the cast collection at the college.  Although I personally didn’t think much of all the works in Cast Contemporaries,the method of display is great as the works have been shown in a cluttered curatorial arrangement, all mixed up with the actual casts.  Cast Contemporaries explores contrasting responses to the fate of the plaster cast collections in art schools which is particularly appropriate as ECA has one of the most important cast collections in the UK.  These casts are a feature of everyday life here and the exhibition considers them as catalysts for future visual arts experimentation.

Cast Contemporaries.  Image via http://fields.eca.ac.uk/

There was still so much to see that it was lucky I had a while longer…

Tim Rollins & K.O.S.: The Black Spot and Working Papers: Donald Judd Drawings, 1963-93 are at Talbot Rice Gallery until 22nd October 2012, www.ed.ac.uk/about/museums-galleries/talbot-riceJohn Bellany at 70 is at Open Eye Gallery until 4th September 2012, www.openeyegallery.co.ukJock McFadyen: The Ability to Cling…. is at Bourne Fine Art until 15th September 2012, www.bournefineart.comDuncan Shanks: Across a Painted Sky is at the Scottish Gallery until 5th September 2012, www.scottish-gallery.co.ukIan Hamilton Finlay: Twilight Remembers is at Ingleby Gallery until 27th October 2012, www.inglebygallery.comRachel Mayeri: Primate Cinema: Apes as Family and Cast Contemporaries are at the Edinburgh College of Art until 2nd September 2012, www.eca.ac.uk.

William Morris back home in Walthamstow

17 Aug

Until yesterday I’d never really thought of Walthamstow as somewhere to go for an afternoon out, unless I’m visiting friends in the area.  But, a quick nip round the North Circular in my little car proved me wrong as the William Morris Gallery is definitely worth a visit.

The William Morris Gallery at Lloyd Park in Walthamstow. Own photograph.

Following a 15 month closure, the Gallery has now re-opened thanks to a £5 million regeneration programme mostly funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund and Waltham Forest Council.  The renovation has been sensitively undertaken by Pringle Richards Sharratt Architects who have retained the original fabric of the building while introducing modern features.

One of the wonderful new galleries. Own photograph.

Now, I never knew this but William Morris was actually born in Walthamstow in 1834 and Water House, a grade II* listed Georgian building, was his family home from 1848-1856.  There was interest in turning the building into a museum in his honour from as early as 1908 but, at that stage, there wasn’t anything to put in it!  Over the years, with the help of Sir Frank Brangwyn RA and others, a collection has been formed and, in 1950, the building became a museum to showcase Morris’s work.  It has remained so ever since.

Blue Plaque. Own photograph.

Morris’s designs are iconic; there can be no doubt that he revolutionised British design and his influence still prevails.  In Victorian times, his graphic style was the height of modernity.  Morris is also known for his strong connections with the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and, in 1861, he founded an interior design business called Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Company; the firm’s partners included Ford Maddox Brown, Dante Gabriel Rossetti (who designed most of their stained glass), Edward Burne-Jones and Philip Morris.  ‘The Firm’, as they were known, strove to make use of natural materials, reviving ancient crafts in their quest for pure quality.  Hand-craftsmanship was paramount to Morris throughout his life and he preferred to make use of small-scale workshops where individuals were trained in a specialist skill.  In 1875, the business was renamed Morris & Co and fell solely under his control.

Honeysuckle Wallpaper that was used at Rounton Grange. Own photograph.

The dense display system in use at the Gallery allows for over 600 objects to be on show at once.  The building has an archive system in a specially designed conservation basement and, as all the collection is now stored on site in this archive, the objects in the public space can be rotated regularly.  Visitors to the gallery move from the introductory area into a room looking at Morris’s formative years and his early forays into design.  Each room progresses through his life showcasing his countless designs.  Embroidery was the first of the textile arts that Morris explored and, through this craft, he fell in love with the experimental, non-commercial ideas that came to typify his practice.

Exploring Morris’s life and work at the Gallery. Own photograph.

Trellis was Morris’s first wallpaper design where he took direct inspiration from the rose trellises in his garden.  Initially, Morris attempted to print the design himself but the results were not to the high standards he sought.  He turned to Jeffrey & Co and they continued to print all his wallpaper designs thereafter.  The sometimes cluttered display shows off the quality and splendour of Morris’s designs.  He famously said Have nothing in your houses that youdo notknow to be useful, or believe to be beautiful’ and there can be no doubt that his designs fulfil the latter criteria.

William Morris, Trellis. Own photograph.

The first floor is less dynamic but explores the founding of Kelmscott Presss, another of Morris’s businesses that printed his volumes of poems and historical tales.  It also investigates Morris’s political views and the Arts and Crafts movement as a whole.  There is a room dedicated to Frank Brangwyn, one of Morris’s apprentices responsible for collecting a large number of the pieces that feature in the Museum.   There are some great interactive features where you can design your own patterns, explore maps, ‘be Morris’ and so on; you’re even encouraged to touch and interact with the objects.

Interactive elements. Own photograph.

The gallery now also has space to stage small-scale exhibitions around modern art and design.  Kickstarting this new programme is Grayson Perry’s rarely-displayed The Walthamstow Tapestry – 15m wide it chronicles our journey from birth to death with characteristic touches such as the seven ages of man reinvented as the seven ages of shopping.

Grayson Perry, The Walthamstow Tapestry. Own photograph.

The museum is light and well-formed with clear identifiers for all the rooms.  Even on a random Thursday morning, the place was packed showing the popularity of Morris.  People still draw inspiration from his creativity and genius.  I never visited the gallery before the refurb so I have no point of comparison but the space is great.  And it’s free.  Thanks to the refurbishment the gallery now houses a café and Morris’s patterns have been fully incorporated into the building, used to carpet the stairs, decorate the ceilings and even paper the walls in the toilets – they’re definitely worth a visit too!

Grayson Perry: The Walthamstow Tapestry is at The William Morris Gallery until 23rd September 2012, www.wmgallery.org.uk.

Frantic at the Fringe 2012 – Part I

11 Aug

I am spending a lot of time in Edinburgh this month.  When I return I hope to visit all the National Galleries but for my first trip my somewhat ambitious plan was to see all the galleries in the Edinburgh Art Festival programme – over 45 exhibitions spread across the city.  I’m not quite sure what prompted this absurd idea but, needless to say, it didn’t happen – I was in Edinburgh working and also seeing a large amount of theatre.  Plus, when I arrived, the Art Festival hadn’t actually started as I found out the hard way (some things never change).

However, this didn’t stop me from seeing a few brilliant shows.

Edinburgh. Own photograph.

The Fruitmarket Gallery is one of my favourite art spaces in Edinburgh.  As well as having a fabulous art programme, they have a brilliant café.  So, it’s practically compulsory to be standing on their doorstep when they open at 10am to start the day with a bacon butty and a cup of piping hot tea.  This done, I was ready to see their current exhibition of Dieter Roth’s Diaries.  This exhibition is the first to focus on Roth’s diaries which he used not only to record appointments, addresses, etc., but also to note his ideas and drawings.  His diaries help us to understand his work and the thinking behind it.  They were an integral part of his life; he even had his suits altered in order that the diaries would fit comfortably in the pockets.

Dieter Roth’s diary. Own photograph.

Many of Roth’s works are presented as visual metaphors of diaries – Flat Waste records a year in his life in rubbish that is less than 1cm thick (I’ve read a fair few different comments on the actual measurements of the rubbish but 1cm is stated in the Fruitmarket bumph that accompanies the exhibition) and Solo Scenes records on 128 video monitors the last year of the artist’s life.

Dieter Roth, Flat Waste. Own photograph.

The rubbish in Flat Waste is presented in 623 ringbinders that together form an archive, housed in specially designed shelving units.  Between each cabinet, a lectern allows visitors to browse a selection of the binders in more detail to appreciate fully the anal precision of this task.  Roth didn’t censor his life and plastic wallets in the ringbinders are filled with random everyday items including orange peel, used tissues and toilet paper (don’t ask!).   There are some anomalies in the dates because a number of the volumes from the original year (1975-6) went missing and Roth decided to replace them with binders of rubbish from the same day in later years.  The folders are labelled in an compulsively consistent pattern.  Using rubbish to make a portrait of his life, Roth is without the forerunner of many artists who consider themselves to be radical.

Dieter Roth, Flat Waste. Own photograph.

Video art has never been my favourite medium but Solo Scenes is incredible, a gripping look at Roth going about his day-to-day activities: getting out of bed, cooking, eating, and even sitting on the toilet, in his homes and studios in Iceland, Switzerland and Germany.  Nowadays, we are familiar with the concept of a video diary but it was far less common when Roth first began experimenting with the idea.  Although many of the activities that Roth carries out are mundane and don’t differ much from our own routines, they allow us to monitor him in an obsessive fashion blurring the boundaries between life and art.  Yet, despite witnessing Roth at such personal moments, he says we don’t necessarily come any closer to understanding him as ‘who knows what people think?’.  The work only came to an end when Roth died of a heart attack – this is a truthful and honest portrayal.

Dieter Roth, Solo Scenes. Own photograph.

As with Flat Waste, Roth hides nothing from us and poignantly shows us the reality of his life – the good, the bad and the ugly.  The exhibition also includes some of Roth’s copybooks and actual diaries.  Roth was never an orthodox or predictable artist; this is an amazing exhibition, showing that everything he did fed into his art.  Indeed his whole life was a voyage, creating diaries that fulfilled his need for constant artistic production.  This was the first exhibition that I saw in Edinburgh and I already knew it was to be a highlight.  It stayed with me for days.

Dieter Roth, Solo Scenes. Own photograph.

Next, I crossed the road to City Art Centre who are showing an exhibition of works by Leslie Hunter.  Hunter was part of The Scottish Colourists who, although they never worked together as a foursome, are brought together by their love of bold colour that revitalised Scottish art – the influence of which can still be seen in the work of artists in Scotland today.

With over 50 works, the exhibition really allows us to get a feel for Hunter’s oeuvre but, having just experienced the moving poignancy of Roth’s work, this exhibition did nothing for me.  Hunter is obviously a good painter but he didn’t excite me.

Leslie Hunter, Peonies in a Chinese Vase, 1925. Image via www.theskinny.co.uk

Upstairs, is a complementary exhibition entitled The Scottish Colourists which shows Hunter’s influences and the work of those who have been influenced by him.  On the top floor is Human Race which I thought would require very little time – I was wrong.  Human Race celebrates pioneering developments in medical imagery, surgery and sports training in the last 200 years.  The exhibition uses intriguing objects from Scottish collections that date as far back as to the Bronze Age and is split into themes; there is an 1820s Hobby Horse, films, drawings and photographs, bone and muscle specimens, a St John’s Ambulance first aid kit from the 1950s and specimen jars used in modern-day anti-doping tests.  The objects could not be more diverse or informative without being overbearing.  There are also a number of commissioned artworks that take inspiration from objects in the exhibition and explore the many tensions that exist in sports and medicine.

Human Race at the City Art Centre. Own photograph.

Heading up the road to Stills, I discovered the gallery wasn’t yet open and it was at this point I found out that the EAF didn’t officially start for a couple of days.  Hmm…  Some people never learn and perhaps that’s me.  Collective, however, had opened so recently that it was still possible to smell the fresh paint in the gallery.  Sadly, this may be their last exhibition in their current Cockburn Street space as they are moving to the City Observatory later this year.  Lying and Liars is a site-specific installation that explores the conflict between storytelling and formal experimentation by mixing different sculptural and architectural forms.  This is a beautiful gallery and its large glass frontage offers multiple perspectives on the unusual exhibitions they mount.

Lying and Liars at Collective. Own photograph.

The next morning I headed to St Andrew’s Square to see another EAF commission; Andrew Miller’s The Waiting Place is this year’s pavilion and is a playful reinterpretation of a summerhouse in one of the busiest areas of the city.  The building is designed to show off an ambitious and ambiguous architectural form.  The title comes from Dr Seuss’s Oh! The Places You’ll Go where the protagonist finds himself in The Waiting Place, ‘a most useless place … for people just waiting’ for a variety of different things to happen.  The pavilion doesn’t have any particular function but can fulfil whatever the visitor needs: ‘Waiting for a train to go, or a bus to come, or a plane to go, or the mail to come, or the rain to go, or the phone to ring, or the snow to snow, or waiting around for a Yes or a No, or waiting for their hair to grow…’.  Even a tree makes use of the pavilion as it erupts from its roof.

Andrew Miller’s The Waiting Place. Own photograph.

Stills was still shut (!) so I climbed the Scotsman Steps, where Martin Creed’s Work No. 1059 is a permanent installation.  Creed re-generated these 104 steps so that every stair is now a different kind and colour of marble.  Last year, I observed that although the staircase is fit for royalty, the city rushes up and down without even noticing its spectacular beauty.  I am more and more convinced that this is the charm of the work.  It is so beautifully integrated into Edinburgh that it is easy to miss yet, when you spot it, you just have to stop and stare at the stairs.  Continuing further into town, I headed to the Talbot Rice Gallery which hadn’t yet opened either.  I began to think that theatre may be easier (my tweets will allow you to track what I saw) and stored my art map in my bag for my next trip.

Martin Creed, Work No. 1059 at the Scotsman Steps. Own photograph.

I never quite managed to be in one of the set spots at 1pm to hear Susan Philipsz’ Timeline but I’ll try again next week.  The work, in response to the One O’Clock Gun makes use of the artist’s own voice to call out across the city every day.  I’ve heard recordings and it’s wonderful.

The Art Festival really must be praised for not only the Guide that they produce but also the map.  This year it has been produced by renowned illustrator Peter Arkle – it’s helpful, comical and beautiful and I’ll carry on working my way through galleries on my return when, hopefully, they’ll be open.

Dieter Roth: Diaries is at The Fruitmarket Gallery until 14th October 2012, www.fruitmarket.co.ukLeslie Hunter: A Life in Colour is at City Art Centre until 14th October 2012 and Human Race: Inside the History of Sports Medicine is at City Art Centre until 9th September 2012, www.edinburghmuseums.org.uk/venues/city-art-centre.aspxMick Peter and B.S. Johnson: Lying and Liars is at Collective until 30th September 2012, www.collectivegallery.net.  Andrew Miller: The Waiting Place is in St. Andrew Square, www.edinburghartfestival.com.  Martin Creed, Work No. 1059 is a permanent installation at The Scotsman Steps, www.martincreed.com.  Susan Philipsz: Timeline can be heard daily at 1pm outside Nelson’s Monument on Calton Hill, at Old Calton Cemetery, on North Bridge, on Waverley Bridge, behind the National Gallery of Scotland on The Mound and in West Princes Street Gardens.

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