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Fitzrovia, Hoxton and a very good Fish Pie

26 Nov

The end of November seems to be overrun with new exhibitions.  Everybody is in a rush to display a host of new work before the Christmas calm hits London as people head home.  And so, on Thursday, I embarked on another plethora of gallery openings starting with the Josh Lilley Gallery – always high up on my must-see list.  For the next month, Josh Lilley is showing a debut exhibition of works by artist, Robert Pratt.  Pratt is fascinated by everyday details that most people would not observe – such as the dirty marks on a pane of glass or the effervescing bubbles in a fizzy drink.  His work seeks to turn these minutiae into a larger, physical reality, thereby forcing us to concentrate on subtle and transient moments.  His sculptures transform and revere the everyday, converting the overlooked into something full of personality that demands respect.  Through an imaginative play on found objects, the work carries a deeper message about the amount that goes unnoticed in our day-to-day lives and calls for us to slow down and admire the detail of the little things.

Robert Pratt, Star Rosette. Own photograph.

Pratt’s work has always been concerned with the gaze, although here it concentrates on the things our gaze misses.  He is not afraid to let these works stand alone; he does not seek to turn them into visually pretty objects but, instead, turns the banal subject matter into a beautiful form by allowing it to have its own presence.   The works all interact, forming trivial but inescapable relationships.  The academic theory behind these works is interesting but, personally, I didn’t find this particular exhibition as inspiring or exciting as the gallery’s previous shows.  However, Lilley sets an extremely high standard and I’m looking forward to their January exhibition of Matt Lipps’ work.

Robert Pratt downstairs at the Josh Lilley Gallery. Own photograph.

Just to make our lives difficult (and more interesting), we headed over to Hoxton.  A long and stressful day and inflexible stilettos necessitated a cab journey as the idea of the tube was rather horrific.  The Hoxton Art Gallery was packed.  Such a buzzy atmosphere is always enticing and passers-by were peering through the glass to see what was going on.  Pushing our way through, we came to a bar set up with local brews – this was certainly an interesting and well-thought out opening.

The Hoxton Art Gallery. Own photograph.

The exhibition celebrates the end of the Hoxton Art Gallery’s first year and showcases four of their artists – Guler Ates, Katie Sims, Lucy Wilson and Ha Young Kim – including new works by each of them.  Individually, there are some gorgeous pieces although there is no strong overriding theme to give the exhibition true coherence.  My works of choice were downstairs; Sims’ paintings draw you closer with her gorgeous technique and abstracted imagery gesturing to blurred landscapes and other worlds.  Ates’ work explores cultural hybrids through a series of haunting photographs.  Her works speak of her own personal experience as a Muslim woman in the 21st century.

Katie Sims, Brooks Ran Gold, 2011. Own photograph.

As it was only a five minute walk away, we headed to Spectra I, the first in a three-part survey presented by Future Tense.  I was pleased we made the effort to trip over the cobbles and make our way here.   This exhibition series focuses on artists for whom dynamic colour relationships is key to their practice.

Chuck Elliot, Radial/TWO, 2011. Own photograph.

Colour has always been an important focus in art but is something that frequently gets side-lined.  The exhibition press release quotes Paul Klee writing that ‘colour is the place where our brain and the universe meet’.  It’s certainly not just Klee who has these opinions.  In fact, it’s a topic that is under constant discussion.  John Ruskin, for example, said ‘The purest and most thoughtful minds are those which love colour the most’ and Oscar Wilde said Mere colour, unspoiled by meaning, and unallied with definite form, can speak to the soul in a thousand different ways’.  You get the idea!  The colours here certainly do speak to the soul.

Chuck Elliott, Blast FIRST/fractureRefract, 2010. Own photograph.

The sole connection here is the seven artists’ concentration on colour although the exhibition is not limited by media.  The project space itself is exceptional and the organisers have put tremendous care into the curation and this has really paid off.  Incredible lighting and installation has made some of the pieces come alive; this is a clever show – the works almost bounce off the walls with their addictive vibrancy.

One of the highlights for me was Lee Baker’s site specific installation – a mesmerising rainbow-like spider’s web of coloured yarns that brings out a childlike playfulness in viewers who can’t help but be intoxicated by the tonal harmonies.   Baker’s works explore the dichotomy between Japan’s fragile, intricate cultural aesthetic and the relentless forces of urbanisation that increasingly mark its landscape.  His wide-ranging influences are often apparent most particularly in his meticulous paintings.

Lee Baker, Refractive Monolith, 2011. Own photograph.

Adam Ball’s paintings radiate as if fuelled by an internal light source, reflecting the energy and life of an ephemeral world.  His intuitive use of colour and light, whether in his paintings or his papercuts, is brilliant.

Adam Ball, Coexistence, 2010. Own photograph.

As you enter the second part of the space, it’s impossible not to be grabbed by Kathrin Fridriks’ work which fuses contemporary imagery with architecture to form a uniquely expressive visual language made from explosions of colour.  The lighting of this piece is a tour de force and it’s hard to imagine it elsewhere.

Kathrin Fridriks, Crayons, 2011. Own photograph.

Although colour may be the overriding theme, there is so much more to these artists’ works than just the aesthetics of colour and their bold statements.  If Spectra II is going to be bigger and better then I’m already excited.

I was starving and just opposite is the perfect restaurant for the East London gallery circuit, accessed through a wonderful bakery and shop.  Albion Caff is wonderful but is certainly not a ‘caff’ and, having forgotten where it was, I was very happy to discover it once again and indulge in their fish pie and share a bottle of English wine and a good gossip.

Robert Pratt: From Table Top to Tiger Print is at the Josh Lilley Gallery until 22nd December 2011, www.joshlilleygallery.comWinter Exhibition is at Hoxton Art Gallery until 19th January 2012, www.hoxtonartgallery.co.ukFuture Tense: Spectra I is at the Londonnewcastle Project Space until 18th December 2011, www.thefuturetense.net.

 

The Circuitous Route to an Artistic Circuit: Flora Parrott at Tintype

30 Sep

Tintype Gallery has moved and I wouldn’t recommend using the google maps ap to find it.  As I walked towards the blue dot, I began to get the feeling things weren’t quite right.  This wasn’t where I had thought the gallery was relocating…something was amiss.  Arriving at the blue dot, my hunch was confirmed – it wasn’t even the right street. Typing in the street address, rather than the postcode, did cheer my ap up considerably but showed I was a reasonable distance out – a £5 cab journey in fact.  My stiletto-ed feet weren’t up to the walk in this sweltering heat.

When I did arrive at St Cross Street I began to feel more confident. This seemed a more appropriate area for a young, emerging gallery and the gallery doors were open to beckon everyone in and up the stairs.

Flora Parrott, detail of Circuit: Five Deductions, 2011. Own photograph.

Tintype has reopened with a striking exhibition of new work by Flora Parrott – an artist in whom I’m particularly interested as she is producing a work for the 2012 exhibition, In Conversation with Stuart Sutcliffe.   For this, Parrott says she is relishing the opportunity to include and acknowledge the mania of 60s popular culture and is responding to a letter of Stuart’s that struck her as particularly raw and dynamic, recognising the explosive and destructive relationships between Stuart and Astrid Kirchner and Stuart and John Lennon.

Although small, the new space looks great and Parrott’s all-encompassing works have transformed the gallery into the artist’s own electric environment.

Flora Parrott, detail of Circuit: Five Deductions, 2011. Own photograph.

Five assemblages, all interconnected by striking black lines of tape, create a circuit in the gallery. The dynamism of the individual sculptures are intended to mimic a sensation based around a skate wing, a snail on glass, a carnivorous plant, a jaw bone and a pillow lava. This use of unusual and diverse media (one ‘deduction’, for example, uses copper paint, cuttlefish dust, slate, OS board, oyster shells and found wood) shows Parrott’s constant experimentation to find textures and compositions that interact and resonate successfully in response to physical sensations.

Flora Parrott, detail of Circuit: Five Deductions, 2011. Own photograph.

Parrott is preoccupied by the sensations of natural phenomena and Circuit: Five Deductions is a means to dissect and communicate these responses, systematically dividing and organising materials into sculptural configurations that play on the senses.

Flora Parrott, detail of Circuit: Five Deductions, 2011. Own photograph.

It is the interaction of Parrott’s works and the circuitry nature of the pieces that makes them special. Yes, they are physically linked but the materials, with their natural resonances, seem to be in dialogue with each other.  Her work is very unusual: deceivingly simple on the surface, the highly complex ideas and structure of the compositions are all encompassing.

Although this exhibition is definitely worth a visit and Flora Parrott’s career is well worth following, be sure you know where you’re going.

Flora Parrott’s Circuit: Five Deductions is at Tintype until 22nd October 2011, www.tintypegallery.com.

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